Passing the IACC

resources

Those that pass...

Follow the guidelines for completion:

  • read and follow the guidance
  • use the template
  • use the marking criteria
pages publications
text

Produce a narrative which assesses own practice:

  • patient and safety focused
  • demonstrates Good Scientific Practice
  • demonstrates current abilities and suggests future improvements
  • instils confidence (in yourself and your assessor)

The reflective narrative needs to:

  • assess your own practice
  • encompass the entire STP training period and experience
  • demonstrate accountability and self-awareness
text

Examples of "What?"; "So What?" and "Now What?"

The following are examples from IACCs which passed. You can identify good practice e.g. they are clearly referenced to evidence in the portfolio but also they reflect the “What?”; “So What?” and the “Now What?”.

After each example an illustration is given on how it reflects Driscoll’s approach to reflection but remember when writing your IACC it must be presented in a continuous narrative following the template and guidance.

The examples follow the structure of What?, So What?, Now What?

  • referenced to portfolio
  • patient safety
  • Good Scientific Practice emphasised
  • concise, logically written – gives a succinct overview
nhs/expander
Domain 1: Professional practice example

“Despite ample exposure to various EEG types [SP S222c7:3, SP SC222c8:3, SP SC222c8:4], I have identified some gaps in my learning. For example, currently I am assisting with ambulatory recordings. Although I have developed my clinical and technical skills, such that I am able to successfully apply and remove the ambulatory device, I ensure that I seek supervision for this [SPS222c8:8]. This is because I recognise that a seemingly small technical error can result in a malfunction, meaning that data has not been captured. This would ultimately delay the diagnostic process and cause undue stress and inconvenience to the patient. By seeking supervision in such instances, I ensure that I work within the limits of my personal competence and therefore minimise any undue harm to the patient. Moving forward, I am also aiming to develop my confidence in reporting full ambulatory recordings. I have worked closely with my training supervisor to devise a plan which will make this achievable over the coming weeks [SPS222c8:10].”


What?

Despite ample exposure to various EEG types [SP S222c7:3, SP SC222c8:3, SP SC222c8:4], I have identified some gaps in my learning. For example, currently I am assisting with ambulatory recordings. Although I have developed my clinical and technical skills, such that I am able to successfully apply and remove the ambulatory device, I ensure that I seek supervision for this [SPS222c8:8].

So What?

This is because I recognise that a seemingly small technical error can result in a malfunction, meaning that data has not been captured. This would ultimately delay the diagnostic process and cause undue stress and inconvenience to the patient. By seeking supervision in such instances, I ensure that I work within the limits of my personal competence and therefore minimise any undue harm to the patient.

Now What?

Moving forward, I am also aiming to develop my confidence in reporting full ambulatory recordings. I have worked closely with my training supervisor to devise a plan which will make this achievable over the coming weeks [SPS222c8:10].

nhs/expander
Domain 2: Scientific practice example

“I have gained knowledge and practical skills in many qualitative and quantitative methods used in laboratory medicine (SLS100:4, SLS103:4). This has established a good breadth of knowledge and shows my abilities in standard 2.1.3. However, when I first started shadowing the duty biochemist role and reflected on these sessions (SC110:13), I realised gaps in my knowledge in some of the analytical methods specific to clinical biochemistry. Therefore prior to starting on the duty biochemist rota, I further enhanced my knowledge of automated and manual analytical methods. One way in which I did this was through completing multiple assay verifications for the biochemistry service, demonstrating 2.2.4 and 2.2.5. These verifications necessitated an understanding of the underlying principles of methods in order to design assay verification experiments and interpret the verification data (SC110:22, SC110:23)”.


What?

I have gained knowledge and practical skills in many qualitative and quantitative methods used in laboratory medicine (SLS100:4, SLS103:4). This has established a good breadth of knowledge and shows my abilities in standard 2.1.3.

So What?

However, when I first started shadowing the duty biochemist role and reflected on these sessions (SC110:13), I realised gaps in my knowledge in some of the analytical methods specific to clinical biochemistry.

Now What?

Therefore prior to starting on the duty biochemist rota, I further enhanced my knowledge of automated and manual analytical methods. One way in which I did this was through completing multiple assay verifications for the biochemistry service, demonstrating 2.2.4 and 2.2.5. These verifications necessitated an understanding of the underlying principles of methods in order to design assay verification experiments and interpret the verification data (SC110:22, SC110:23).

nhs/expander
Global statement example

“I believe I have been an extremely hard-working trainee throughout my time on the STP, with one comment on MSF 2 describing an ‘almost impeccable work ethic’ alongside multiple positive comments on my professionalism (MSF: 2). I believe this has been reflected across all 5 domains of the GSP that is required to be a clinical scientist. This work ethic has been reflected in both my academic work and clinical practice. Successfully passing the BSE written exam alongside multiple ultrasound competencies (SPS121: 11-13) allowed me to demonstrate the knowledge and ability required to perform, analyse, and report echocardiograms. One of my goals over the next year is to gain my full BSE accreditation. The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly impacted my training to some extent. It was however an opportunity to gain skills and assist in different areas such as learning more about correct PPE usage. This was reflected in becoming a fit tester for the trust and advising on the correct FFP-3 masks required. As the pandemic appears to be easing, I believe there will be more opportunity to gain exposure to the areas I missed out on during the pandemic. These mainly relate to more ward-based scanning, such as suspected endocarditis scans and post-surgical referrals, as trainees we weren’t allowed on ward rounds to minimise the number of people”.


What?

I believe I have been an extremely hard-working trainee throughout my time on the STP, with one comment on MSF 2 describing an ‘almost impeccable work ethic’ alongside multiple positive comments on my professionalism (MSF: 2). I believe this has been reflected across all 5 domains of the GSP that is required to be a clinical scientist. This work ethic has been reflected in both my academic work and clinical practice.

So What?

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly impacted my training to some extent. It was however an opportunity to gain skills and assist in different areas such as learning more about correct PPE usage. This was reflected in becoming a fit tester for the trust and advising on the correct FFP-3 masks required.

Now What?

As the pandemic appears to be easing, I believe there will be more opportunity to gain exposure to the areas I missed out on during the pandemic. These mainly relate to more ward-based scanning, such as suspected endocarditis scans and post-surgical referrals, as trainees we weren’t allowed on ward rounds to minimise the number of people.

text
resources

Complete examples of the 5 domains

The following examples are from trainees who successfully passed their IACC. All references to the trainee and location have been removed.

publications